For information on research referred to in these Parachute infographics, please see the References page.

Collision avoidance technologies

Positive and negative driving effects associated with common collision avoidance technologies.

Vision Zero calls for safer car designs and technologies to improve road safety. Collision avoidance systems are a technology that can help drivers to avoid hazards; but their effectiveness depends partly on driver behaviour.

Forward collision warning

Positive effect:
50 per cent of drivers with forward collision warning follow less closely.

forward collision warning causes drivers to follow less closely

Negative effect:
5 per cent look away from the road more often.

forward collision warning causes drivers to look away from road

Lane departure warning

Positive effect:
67-71 per cent of drivers with lane departure warning drift from travel lanes less often.

Graphic of lane departure warning increasing turn signal usage

Positive effect:
54-64 per cent of drivers with lane departure warning use their turn signals more often.

lane departure warning increases turn signal usage

Active headlights

Negative effects:

  • 18 per cent of drivers with active headlights are more willing to drive faster.
  • 40 per cent are more willing to drive at night.
collision avoidance technologies infographic

Collision avoidance technologies

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Complete rural roads

The majority of fatal crashes occur in rural locations. 

road design with 2+1 roads and rumble strips
2+1 roads with central cable barrier and rumble strips.

Road design strategies proven to increase safety and mobility for rural road users.

  • 2+1 roads with a central cable barrier can reduce fatal collisions sand serious injuries by 55 per cent
  • Roundabouts can reduce the risk of fatal crashes by 50-70 per cent.
  • Rumble strips can reduce off-road collisions by up to 36 per cent.
  • Street lighting at rural intersections can reduce night-time crashes by 25-40 per cent.

Complete rural roads

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Complete urban streets

The majority of Canadians live in urban settings and collisions commonly occur at city intersections.

Road design strategies proven to increase safety and mobility for urban intersections.

  • Advance stop lines can increase the likelihood of drivers yielding to pedestrians crossings by approximately 60 per cent.
  • Protected bike lanes can reduce vehicle-bicycle crashes resulting in injuries by as much as 90 per cent.
  • Pedestrian/raised refuge islands can reduce vehicle-pedestrian crashes by 46 per cent.
  • Protected left-turns can reduce left-turn collisions by up to 99 per cent.
advance stop lines in urban streets
Advance stop lines
left turn signal
Protected left-turns
pedestrian islands on urban street
Pedestrian islands
complete urban streets infographic

Complete urban streets

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Safe schools

Various changes to the built environment around schools can help lower the risk for pedestrian injuries and ensure kids get to and from school safely.

  • Ensure school crossings and marked crosswalks are available. Most collisions within school zones occur at mid block locations, not intersections.
  • Encourage active school travel. Presence of sidewalks and multi-use paths increases active transportation.
  • Employ traffic calming measures. Speed humps are effective at reducing child pedestrian collisions. Other examples include traffic circles or pinch points.
  • Develop safe school drop off and pick up plans. Dangerous driving behaviours in and around student drop-offs increase the risk of pedestrian motor vehicle collisions.
  • Reduce speed limit in school zones. Pedestrians have a 90 per cent chance of survival when struck by a car travelling at 30 km/h or below, but less than 50 per cent chance of surviving an impact at 45 km/h.
infographic

Safe schools

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Teen beliefs about cannabis and driving

Common misconceptions Canadian youth have about cannabis and its harm according to the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction (CCSA).

Belief: “If I only had one toke, then I could drive absolutely fine.”
Fact: Cannabis doubles the risk of being in a serious crash.

Belief: “Driving high is a terrible idea but it’s probably not as bad as alcohol.”
Fact: Nearly one-third of drivers who die in a crash test positive for cannabis.

Belief: “If I were to drive high, I think I’d be more focused.”
Fact: Cannabis can reduce your ability to concentrate, alter perceptions of time and space and slow reaction times.

Belief: “A lot of people do it and very few get caught.”
Fact: Police report nearly 3,000 drug-impaired driving incidents per year.

Fact: 100 per cent of impaired driving is preventable and not worth the risk.

Teen beliefs about cannabis and driving

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