Awareness-raising campaigns can educate students, parents and the community about your ERS project.

They can also be used to promote sustainable modes of transport and support physical infrastructure changes. Think about using one of these campaigns to launch your ERS project at your school. 

We’ve developed a suite of illustrations that can be used on posters or other materials to promote your Elementary Road Safety awareness campaigns.

Walking Blitzes

Illustration of older girl and younger boy walking
  • Raise awareness of walking and consider ways to increase active and safe routes to school. 
  • Run a poster campaign or an art contest to promote children walking and cycling more.
  • Create an incentive. Use a simple prize for the top walker of the month or have a healthy breakfast morning for those who choose to walk on a certain day.
  • Develop a “Walking School Bus”, where children walk together with caregivers and police from various meeting points around school. 
  • October is International Walk to School Month, known as IWALK. Check out those resources and programs to support your efforts to get more children walking to school.

Cycling and Wheeling Blitzes

Illustration of boy riding bicycle, wearing helmet
  • Provide cycle and wheeling training from your local road safety officer for students to practise safe wheeling skills away from traffic.
  • Launch a poster campaign indicating the local cycling routes and cycle/wheeling parking locations. 
  • Create an incentive award of the “cyclist of the month” to win a free bike. The more a student cycles/wheels to school, the more the times their name is entered into a draw.
  • Obtain more cycle/wheeling parking and locate it in a visible place on school grounds.
  • Run a “bike doctor” event. Ask students to bring in their old bikes and organize a bike mechanic to deliver a workshop to get those bikes back in shape.
  • Tap into Bike Month in May and back to school week. There are many tips and advice on other events that will inspire ideas for your school.

Idling and Illegal Parking Blitzes

These campaigns focus on changing parent and adult behaviour.

  • Create a mock ticketing program for enforcement officers and student volunteers to ticket “fake ticket” cars that remain idling in a certain area or are parked illegally (parked in crosswalk or stop sign areas; double parking).
  • Discuss a “no idling” campaign with your Green Schools Committee, if you have one.
  • Ask parents to sign a pledge to stop parking illegally. 

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