Many Canadian cities and provinces have adopted Vision Zero or are considering Vision Zero. This map records official adoption as the month and year the jurisdiction officially approved a Vision Zero traffic safety plan. To see details on each jurisdiction, select the map markers or select the jurisdiction from the menu listing. To add your jurisdiction or to get in touch with one of these jurisdictions, please contact us at visionzero@parachute.ca.

Vision Zero

Canadian cities, regions, provinces and territories that have adopted Vision Zero:

  • 2 Provinces
  • 15 Cities
  • 2 Regions
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Cities, regions, provinces and territories where adoption of Vision Zero is being debated, or is anticipated shortly.

  • 6 Cities
  • 2 Regions
See full list

Canadian cities, regions, provinces and territories that have adopted Vision Zero: *Official adoption is stated by the month/year the Vision Zero traffic safety plan was officially approved.

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Cities, regions, provinces and territories where adoption of Vision Zero is being debated, or is anticipated shortly.

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Halifax, NS

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Adopted in June 2018.

Halifax adopted their Strategic Road Safety Plan for 2018 to 2023 in 2018. Halifax draws a distinction between “Vision Zero” and “Towards Zero”/”Road To Zero”: the latter is described as recognizing the reality that zero deaths and injuries cannot be accomplished immediately. The goal currently is 15 per cent reduction of fatal and injury collisions within five years.

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Brantford, ON

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Adopted in July 2018.

Council passed a motion to adopt Vision Zero in their road safety planning in 2018 and Brantford has now publicly commit to Vision Zero. Brantford is still in the process of developing their plan, and their strategy is expected to be tabled for consideration at some point in 2019.

Durham Region, ON

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Adopted in April 2019.

Durham Region first initiated their Strategic Road Safety Action Plan Project in 2017. Durham collaborated with evidence-based action plan. The goal for the first five years (2019-2023) is to reduce fatal and injury collisions by at least 10 per cent. Regional Council approved the Strategic Road Safety Action Plan in 2019, and Durham held its official launch of Durham Vision Zero in May 2019.

Hamilton, ON

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Adopted in February 2019.

Hamilton has officially adopted a Vision Zero-oriented road safety plan as part of its overall Strategic Road Safety Program (SRSP). The SRSP aims to “eliminate incidents that result in injury or fatality”, and was re-established in August 2014 with Vision Zero in mind. Hamilton’s Vision Zero Action Plan is anticipated to change as more safety data becomes available.

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Kingston, ON

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Adopted in September 2019.

In 2016, City Council asked the City to develop an overall road safety strategy. Research and background work began in 2017, and their Vision Zero Road Safety Plan was approved in 2019. Kingston’s goal over the next 20 years is for zero traffic fatalities, zero serious injury collisions and zero collisions with vulnerable road users. Their five-year plan is a 10 per cent reduction in serious collisions.

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London, ON

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Adopted in May 2017.

London’s Municipal Council adopted the Vision Zero principles for the City of London in 2017. The principles were attached to the implementation of the 2014-2019 London Road Safety Strategy, which continued to define the City’s and Middlesex County’s approach to traffic safety. The City of London currently describes Vision Zero as an “aspirational goal”.

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North Bay, ON

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A “soft approval” to pursue Vision Zero was given in 2017, and City Council endorsed a framework for North Bay Vision Zero in September 2018 (Bortolon, 2018; City of North Bay, 2018). Development of a five-year action plan is underway and so the program is not considered to be in implementation at this time.

Ottawa, ON

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Ottawa’s road safety plan is currently based on its Safer Roads Ottawa Program. While the City is not adopting the “Vision Zero” tag line, Ottawa’s Road Safety Action Plans have always incorporated components of the safe systems approach and other road safety philosophies.

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Region of Peel, ON

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Adopted in December 2017.

The Region of Peel Council adopted the Vision Zero framework in 2017, planning to bring a strategic plan to Council in 2018. In 2018, Peel’s Vision Zero Road Safety Strategic Plan 2018-2022 was formally approved. The plan is fully committed to working towards zero fatal and injury collisions for all road users.

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Toronto, ON

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Adopted in July 2016. Vision Zero 2.0 released in March 2019.

The City of Toronto introduced their Vision Zero Road Safety Plan (2017-2021) in 2016, after two years of development with around 12 partner agencies and approval from Toronto City Council. In 2019, Toronto City Council approved Vision Zero 2.0, which represents a renewed commitment to the Vision Zero approach and an updated focus on efforts to achieve road safety goals.

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Windsor, ON

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In 2019, Windsor’s city council heard comments from the Windsor Bicycling Committee, Ford City Neighbourhood Renewal and Bike Windsor Essex recommending the development of a Vision Zero policy; thereafter, the city’s Environment Transportation & Public Safety Standing Committee requested a draft Vision Zero policy be developed (City of Windsor, 2019). Limited information is available regarding the status of Vision Zero in Windsor at this time.

Montreal, QC

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Adopted in September 2016.

Elected City Officials in Montreal launched a Vision Zero initiative for the first time in 2016, which reinstated the road safety content from their 2008 Transportation Plan. This was the city’s first step towards a concrete Vision Zero action plan, which then officially launched in 2018.

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Trois-Rivières, QC

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Adopted in November 2018.

In 2018, City Council expressed adherence to the overall Vision Zero philosophy with zero dead or seriously injured on the streets of Trois-Rivières. Public consultations were then held in 2019, and the first concrete measures towards Vision Zero road safety plan are expected to be in place in 2020.

Manitoba

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Adopted in September 2017.

Manitoba defined their commitment to Vision Zero in the Manitoba Road Safety Plan 2017-2020: the Road To Zero. Their approach is outlined as “Towards Zero” rather than “Vision Zero” and the plan states, “Towards Zero maintains that while not all types of crashes may be prevented, traffic deaths and severe injuries are preventable.”

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Winnipeg, MB

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In January 2018, an informational report was submitted to the Standing Policy Committee outlining the high-level theoretical framework for the road safety strategy founded in “Towards Zero”, first discussed in January 2017 (City of Winnipeg, 2018). However, the plan has not yet been completed, and the work is being repurposed for the overall transportation master plan. It is unclear whether that plan will also have a “Towards Zero” orientation or when it will be delivered (Glowacki, 2019).

Saskatoon, SK

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Adopted in principle in September 2018.

In 2017, City Council approved funding transportation safety improvements, which outlined funding for Vision Zero, including launching the Vision Zero initiative and Vision Zero educational campaign. They then held a planning session in May 2018. In September 2018, Saskatoon’s Standing Policy Committee on Transportation agreed to adopt Vision Zero in principle, committing Saskatoon to moving towards zero road-related deaths and severe injuries.

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Calgary, AB

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Adopted in November 2018.

The City of Calgary’s movement toward Vision Zero began in the Calgary Safer Mobility Plan, 2019-2023, introduced in 2018. Their plan is aligned with the Province of Alberta Traffic Safety Plan, Transport Canada’s Road Safety Strategy, and the Global Decade of Action. Overall, the plan builds on the work completed during the previous term (2013-2017) with simplification of targets and increased funding.

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County of Grande Prairie No. 1

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Grande Prairie voiced its endorsement of Vision Zero principles in 2017, and the County attempted to adopt Vision Zero principles formally in 2017. Currently there are various road safety initiatives; however, it is unclear if these will come together under a singular Vision Zero plan.

Edmonton, AB

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First Canadian city to adopt Vision Zero, in September 2015.

When more than 8,200 residents were injured and/or killed on the Edmonton roads in 2006, the City developed the first municipal Office of Traffic Safety in North America and has continuously taken steps to improve road safety. In September 2015, City council approved Edmonton’s Road Safety Strategy 2016-2020, making Edmonton the first Canadian city to officially adopt Vision Zero.

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Fort Saskatchewan, AB

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Adopted in April 2019.

Fort Saskatchewan originally committed to Vision Zero in 2018, and introduced a road safety plan affirming their commitment to Vision Zero in 2019. While the plan supports Alberta’s traffic safety strategies, the Capital Region Intersection Safety Partnership joint vision, Canada’s Road Safety Strategy 2025 and RCMP Traffic Services Safety Strategic Plans, it is designed to meet the unique needs of Fort Saskatchewan.

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Leduc, AB

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Leduc has not officially adopted Vision Zero yet, but introduction is anticipated at some point in 2020. Leduc’s program already endorses the SSA and 5 Es of traffic safety (RCMP, 2018).

St. Albert, AB

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Adopted in September 2018.

In 2018, St. Albert formally adopted Vision Zero in their road safety planning, through the development of a Transportation Safety Plan. In St. Albert’s Transportation Safety Plan 2018-2025, the City explicitly references the goal of elimination of fatalities and major injuries within the transportation system.

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Strathcona County, AB

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Adopted Safe Systems Approach in 2014; Strathcona County has avoided calling their plan an official “Vision Zero Plan”, as they do not feel they have community buy-in as of yet.

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Surrey, BC

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Adopted in January 2019.

Surrey worked with and consulted partners and agencies to develop their Vision Zero Plan. The City held stakeholder sessions, conducted market research and solicited community opinions and residents’ feedback. City Council approved the plan in 2019, with a goal of a minimum 15 per cent reduction in collisions that result in deaths and serious injuries within five years.

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Vancouver, BC

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Adopted December 2016.

The Moving Towards Zero Safety Action Plan was introduced in 2016. Vision Zero is also cited in and supported by Vancouver’s Transportation 2040 Plan, which sets out infrastructure improvements and policy suggestions to enhance road safety for different types of road users, such as pedestrians and cyclists. A mixture of long-term and short-term policy directions have been identified to support Vision Zero in Vancouver.

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British Columbia

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Adopted in January 2016.

In 2016, British Columbia became the first Canadian province to adopt Vision Zero. To re-affirm their commitment to road safety, the province released Moving to Vision Zero: Road Safety Strategy Update and Showcase of Innovation in British Columbia. This strategy aligns with Canada’s Road Safety Strategy and officially adopts Vision Zero, with a goal of zero fatalities or serious injuries and the safest roads in North America by 2020.

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