Many Canadian cities and provinces have adopted Vision Zero or are considering Vision Zero. This map records official adoption as the month and year the jurisdiction officially approved a Vision Zero traffic safety plan. To see details on each jurisdiction, select the map markers or select the jurisdiction from the menu listing. To add your jurisdiction or to get in touch with one of these jurisdictions, please contact us at visionzero@parachute.ca.

Vision Zero

Canadian cities, regions, provinces and territories that have adopted Vision Zero:

  • 3 Provinces
  • 25 Cities
  • 3 Regions
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Cities, regions, provinces and territories where adoption of Vision Zero is being debated, or is anticipated shortly.

  • 6 Cities
  • 3 Regions
See full list

Cities, regions, provinces and territories where adoption of Vision Zero is being debated, or is anticipated shortly.

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Quebec

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The Sûreté du Québec, announced in August, 2023 that it will embark on a five-year plan to increase road safety based on Vision Zero. The new plan outlines 27 measures to increase the safety of roads, specifically in vulnerable locations, such as school zones and construction sites. The changes will include reduced speed limits in some areas, improved signage, increased photo radar, and increased requirements for Commercial A trucking licenses.

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Kitchener, ON

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In 2019, the City of Kitchener began efforts to build a Vision Zero plan for 2022-2025. The plan has been built off of the community feedback from meetings with several stakeholders and community residents and has three main areas of focus: vulnerable street users (including school children, seniors, pedestrians, and others), high risk locations (including school zones, residential zones, and hot spots), and high-risk driving (including aggressive driving, distracted driving, and speeding).

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Coquitlam, BC

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While the British Columbia Vision Zero in Road Safety Grant Program was established in 2021, Coquitlam’s city council officially announced their move towards Vision Zero in June of 2023. Their Road Safety Strategy (RSS), which is expected to be ready for approval by late 2024, focuses on six core themes: safe speeds, safe road designs, safe road users, safer vehicles, post-crash care, and land use management. The BC Vision Zero grant program is also funding speed bump installation in the City of Coquitlam as part of Stream 1 of their program.

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Windsor, ON

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Windsor’s Vision Zero Action Plan was approved by Council on January 15, 2024. The overall goal of the Vision Zero Plan is the elimination of fatal and major injury collisions on streets under the jurisdiction of the City of Windsor within 15 years of adoption of the Vision Zero Action Plan.

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Halifax, NS

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Adopted in June 2018.

Halifax adopted their Strategic Road Safety Plan for 2018 to 2023 in 2018. Halifax draws a distinction between “Vision Zero” and “Towards Zero”/”Road To Zero”: the latter is described as recognizing the reality that zero deaths and injuries cannot be accomplished immediately. The goal currently is 15 per cent reduction of fatal and injury collisions within five years.

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Mississauga, ON

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The City of Mississauga committed to Vision Zero in 2018 through a Council-approved motion. Mississauga City Council also passed a resolution to adopt Vision Zero and work towards a goal of zero fatalities and serious injuries as a result of collisions on city streets. The City’s pledge to achieve Vision Zero was further strengthened through the Transportation Master Plan (TMP) approved in 2019. This led to the development of the Vision Zero Action Plan which provides city staff with actions they can apply to their current and ongoing projects so that they contribute to the Vision Zero goal of eliminating fatalities and serious injuries in the transportation system.

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Guelph, ON

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On January 24, 2022, Council approved the Road Safety: City of Guelph Transportation Master Plan. With this plan, the city has committed to the target of Vision Zero using the Safe System Approach. The plan is committed to a transportation system for all ages and abilities across all modes of transportation including walking, biking, driving, transit, and mobility devices. The plan aims to reduce the likelihood of collisions and reduce the consequence of collisions by protecting vulnerable road users and improving street function and design.

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Niagara Region, ON

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Niagara Region is in the process of developing a Road Safety Strategic Plan to improve safety for all road users and reflect their commitment to Vision Zero. As of May 2023, Niagara Region has selected their preliminary emphasis areas and hopes to move into developing the plan as of November 2023, allowing the plan to be in effect for 2024-2027.

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Kamloops, BC

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On October 31, 2023, The City of Kamloops Council voted to adopt the Vision Zero Strategy and Action Plan. The strategy is composed of 27 individual strategies in five emphases areas that aim to improve the safety for all road users in Kamloops, guiding everything from road design and traffic speeds, to signalization and sidewalks, while consideraing operational requirements from all partners, such as emergency vehicle access, snow removal, asphalt integrity, accessibility, school zones, and more.

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Regina, SK

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Previous council approved a Vision Zero plan in 2019, which focused specifically on school zones and parks, and playgrounds. An updated Vision Zero report will be completed and presented to City Council in Spring of 2024.

Saanich, BC

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In February 2022 Council adopted Vision Zero and they directed staff to develop a Road Safety Action Plan (RSAP) in alignment with Vision Zero and a Safe Systems Approach. Saanich has targets to increase the number of people walking, cycling and using public transit to get around. At the same time, Saanich also has a target to reduce the amount of greenhouse gases being emitted into our atmosphere. As of May 18, 2023, City Council received an update on the planning process for the Road Safety Action Plan (RSAP) which is expected to be completed by the fall of 2023.

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Saint John, NB

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The City of Saint John has developed a three-phase project called MoveSJ. This project will guide how people and goods will move throughout the city and transportation infrastructure investments over the next 25 years. Currently Phase 1 and 2 of the project have been completed. The project sits in Phase 3 currently, with the last draft of the plan proposed on October 30, 2020.

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St. John’s, NL

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In early 2020, St. John’s city council discussed the possibility of adopting a Vision Zero approach. Currently the City does not have a formal Vision Zero policy, but the City’s annual intersection safety program will contribute to a Vision Zero approach.

Burnaby, BC

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Connecting Burnaby: Burnaby’s Transportation Plan was approved by Council on December 13th 2021. This plan will guide transportation planning and policy decision making in Burnaby for the next 30 years. Much of the plan is about rethinking how people move throughout the city. The plan is grounded in the idea of climate action, with an emphasis on encouraging more sustainable modes of transportation in Burnaby. This updated plan introduced measurable targets that they aim to achieve by 2050, with a core target of Vision Zero: a 100% reduction in traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

 

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York Region

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York Region’s Vision Zero Traveller Safety Plan 2024-2028 on was approved by the Regional Council on March 21, 2024, with the goal of improving road safety and reducing traffic-related fatalities and injuries across the region by 10% over the next 5 years. The plan applies a Safe Systems Approach and was made in collaboration with local cities, towns, various partners, stakeholders, and residents. The plan identifies short and long-term solutions, emphasizing 5 key areas where countermeasures will have the greatest impact on road safety:

  • Vulnerable Road Users (VRUs)
  • Intersections
  • Aggressive Driving
  • Distracted Driving
  • Impaired Driving

 

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Brantford, ON

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The City of Brantford adopted the Vision Zero initiative in 2018. Since then, the City of Brantford have created Vision Zero: The City of Brantford’s Road Safety Plan (2021-2026) which aims to address a number of goals and priorities for the city, including promoting safe, healthy, and age-friendly built environments. This five year plan outlines the projects the City of Brantford and community partners have committed to delivering to achieve the Vision Zero goals. The plan also focuses on three pillars to emphasize road safety: engineering, education, and enforcement.

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Durham Region, ON

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Adopted in April 2019.

Durham Region first initiated their Strategic Road Safety Action Plan Project in 2017. Durham collaborated with evidence-based action plan. The goal for the first five years (2019-2023) is to reduce fatal and injury collisions by at least 10 per cent. Regional Council approved the Strategic Road Safety Action Plan in 2019, and Durham held its official launch of Durham Vision Zero in May 2019.

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Hamilton, ON

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Adopted in February 2019.

Hamilton has officially adopted a Vision Zero-oriented road safety plan as part of its overall Strategic Road Safety Program (SRSP). The SRSP aims to “eliminate incidents that result in injury or fatality”, and was re-established in August 2014 with Vision Zero in mind. Hamilton’s Vision Zero Action Plan is anticipated to change as more safety data becomes available.

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Kingston, ON

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Kingston’s Vision Zero Road Safety Plan (RSP) was received and approved by Council in September 2019. The RSP provides identifies seven emphasis areas resulting from collision data analysis and supported by the priorities of the technical road safety advisory group and of the public. These areas are: intersections, distracted driving, aggressive driving, impaired driving, pedestrians, cyclists, young demographic.

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London, ON

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Adopted in May 2017.

London’s Municipal Council adopted the Vision Zero principles for the City of London in 2017. The principles were attached to the implementation of the 2014-2019 London Road Safety Strategy, which continued to define the City’s and Middlesex County’s approach to traffic safety. The City of London currently describes Vision Zero as an “aspirational goal”.

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North Bay, ON

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After a “soft approval” for the pursuit of Vision Zero was endorsed by City Council in 2017, North Bay, ON, a new Road Safety Strategy is in progress as of May 2023. Working to highlight goals, guidelines, and initiatives to help make North Bay a safer space for road users, the strategy is expected to appear before council for approval in the summer of 2024.

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Ottawa, ON

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In 2019 the city created the 2020-2024 Road Safety Action Plan, built on the success of the previous plan. The plan is guided by the theme of “Think Safety, Act Safely” and focuses efforts and resources where they are needed most to have the greatest impact on reducing collisions resulting in serious injury or death. This new plan also emphasises towards zero fatalities and major injuries vision and goal.

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Region of Peel, ON

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Adopted in December 2017.

The Region of Peel Council adopted the Vision Zero framework in 2017, planning to bring a strategic plan to Council in 2018. In 2018, Peel’s Vision Zero Road Safety Strategic Plan 2018-2022 was formally approved. The plan is fully committed to working towards zero fatal and injury collisions for all road users.

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Toronto, ON

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Adopted in July 2016. Vision Zero 2.0 released in March 2019.

The City of Toronto introduced their Vision Zero Road Safety Plan (2017-2021) in 2016, after two years of development with around 12 partner agencies and approval from Toronto City Council. In 2019, Toronto City Council approved Vision Zero 2.0, which represents a renewed commitment to the Vision Zero approach and an updated focus on efforts to achieve road safety goals.

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Montreal, QC

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Adopted in September 2016.

Elected City Officials in Montreal launched a Vision Zero initiative for the first time in 2016, which reinstated the road safety content from their 2008 Transportation Plan. This was the city’s first step towards a concrete Vision Zero action plan, which then officially launched in 2018. Currently the city has developed a new action plan for 2022 to 2024.

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Trois-Rivières, QC

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Adopted in November 2018.

In 2018, City Council expressed adherence to the overall Vision Zero philosophy with zero dead or seriously injured on the streets of Trois-Rivières. Public consultations were then held in 2019, and the first concrete measures towards Vision Zero road safety plan are expected to be in place in 2020.

Manitoba

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Adopted in September 2017.

Manitoba defined their commitment to Vision Zero in the Manitoba Road Safety Plan 2017-2020: the Road To Zero. Their approach is outlined as “Towards Zero” rather than “Vision Zero” and the plan states, “Towards Zero maintains that while not all types of crashes may be prevented, traffic deaths and severe injuries are preventable.”

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Winnipeg, MB

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On July 21, 2022, City Council approved the Winnipeg Road Safety Strategic Action Plan, which will serve as a roadmap for implementing both short-term solutions and long-term investments to ensure the city is doing its part in preventing serious injury and death on our roads. The plan consists of 67 actions to help Winnipeg reach its goal of a 20-per-cent reduction in fatal and serious injury collisions over the next five years, with a long-term vision of a transportation system that allows people of all ages and abilities to safely move around without experiencing death or serious injury.

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Saskatoon, SK

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Adopted in principle in September 2018.

In 2017, City Council approved funding transportation safety improvements, which outlined funding for Vision Zero, including launching the Vision Zero initiative and Vision Zero educational campaign. They then held a planning session in May 2018. In September 2018, Saskatoon’s Standing Policy Committee on Transportation agreed to adopt Vision Zero in principle, committing Saskatoon to moving towards zero road-related deaths and severe injuries.

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Calgary, AB

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Adopted in November 2018.

The City of Calgary’s movement toward Vision Zero began in the Calgary Safer Mobility Plan, 2019-2023, introduced in 2018. Their plan is aligned with the Province of Alberta Traffic Safety Plan, Transport Canada’s Road Safety Strategy, and the Global Decade of Action. Overall, the plan builds on the work completed during the previous term (2013-2017) with simplification of targets and increased funding.

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County of Grande Prairie No. 1

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Grande Prairie voiced its endorsement of Vision Zero principles in 2017, and the County attempted to adopt Vision Zero principles formally in 2017. Currently there are various road safety initiatives; however, it is unclear if these will come together under a singular Vision Zero plan.

Edmonton, AB

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First Canadian city to adopt Vision Zero, in September 2015.

When more than 8,200 residents were injured and/or killed on the Edmonton roads in 2006, the City developed the first municipal Office of Traffic Safety in North America and has continuously taken steps to improve road safety. In September 2015, City council approved Edmonton’s Road Safety Strategy 2016-2020, making Edmonton the first Canadian city to officially adopt Vision Zero.

In 2021, a Safe Mobility Strategy for 2021-2025 was developed to achieve Vision Zero in Edmonton. Edmonton has seen drastic decreases in fatalities and injuries since they began Vision Zero efforts in 2015.

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Fort Saskatchewan, AB

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Adopted in April 2019.

Fort Saskatchewan originally committed to Vision Zero in 2018, and introduced a road safety plan affirming their commitment to Vision Zero in 2019. While the plan supports Alberta’s traffic safety strategies, the Capital Region Intersection Safety Partnership joint vision, Canada’s Road Safety Strategy 2025 and RCMP Traffic Services Safety Strategic Plans, it is designed to meet the unique needs of Fort Saskatchewan.

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Leduc, AB

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The City intends to begin to update their Transportation Master Plan, a long-term plan for the city’s transportation network, in 2023 with completion expected for 2024.

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St. Albert, AB

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Adopted in September 2018.

In 2018, St. Albert formally adopted Vision Zero in their road safety planning, through the development of a Transportation Safety Plan. In St. Albert’s Transportation Safety Plan 2018-2025, the City explicitly references the goal of elimination of fatalities and major injuries within the transportation system.

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Strathcona County, AB

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Adopted Safe Systems Approach in 2014; Strathcona County has avoided calling their plan an official “Vision Zero Plan”, as they do not feel they have community buy-in as of yet.

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Surrey, BC

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Adopted in January 2019.

Surrey worked with and consulted partners and agencies to develop their Vision Zero Plan. The City held stakeholder sessions, conducted market research and solicited community opinions and residents’ feedback. City Council approved the plan in 2019, with a goal of a minimum 15 per cent reduction in collisions that result in deaths and serious injuries within five years.

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Vancouver, BC

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Adopted December 2016.

The Moving Towards Zero Safety Action Plan was introduced in 2016. Vision Zero is also cited in and supported by Vancouver’s Transportation 2040 Plan, which sets out infrastructure improvements and policy suggestions to enhance road safety for different types of road users, such as pedestrians and cyclists. A mixture of long-term and short-term policy directions have been identified to support Vision Zero in Vancouver.

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British Columbia

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Adopted in January 2016.

In 2016, British Columbia became the first Canadian province to adopt Vision Zero. To re-affirm their commitment to road safety, the province released Moving to Vision Zero: Road Safety Strategy Update and Showcase of Innovation in British Columbia. This strategy aligns with Canada’s Road Safety Strategy and officially adopts Vision Zero, with a goal of zero fatalities or serious injuries and the safest roads in North America by 2020.

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